Promoting brand safety and how this makes us(me) emo


We’ve all seen that commercial.  You know the one that makes you well up with tears in your eyes or bury your face in a pillow, because it’s well…emotional.   Whether it’s a Cotton brand commercial or the newest APSCA awareness television ad, advertisers know very well how to tug at your heart strings. 

Case in point, the new Subaru commercial featuring a father handing over the car keys to his daughter as she sets off to drive alone for the first time.  The daughter begins in the ad as a six-year-old girl behind the wheel as her father gives her safety advice through the passenger side window.  When he finally hands her the keys, the audience sees that it’s really been a 16-year-old, even though her father stills sees her as his “little girl”.  Clearly, the ad is meant to spotlight the intrinsic safety of Subaru vehicles which is suitable in the time of a teen’s life when they are capable of driving the family vehicle, as the ad tries to authentically portray. 

Interestingly, it was brought to my attention that the two girls in the ad are real-life sisters and the dad is the real father to both girls.  The producers of the ad decided to throw out the script and simply asked the father what he would tell his daughter before she pulled away.  He took it from there and used his real life anxiety from the very situation depicted in the commercial.

Whether or not you’re a parent, this authenticity can easily be related to anyone’s own life experience.  Not currently a parent, I can only imagine the anxiety I’ll experience someday as I hand over the keys to my own child.  But my understanding of the heartfelt emotion is brought about by simply looking at the situation from my own father’s eyes.  I immediately reflect on my own life and see how I could have caused him a great deal of stress back in my teenage years of driving (and most likely continue to do so…sorry dad).  In a whirlwind of memories and flashes of imagination from what may or may not be my future, I’m instantly thrown into a cognitive need to purchase a Subaru.   (I feel at this point I should mention that I neither own a Subaru, nor am in the market for one.) Yet,  I am here to express my thoughts on this particular advertisement.  And they are enthusiastic thoughts.  Suddenly, I favor the Subaru vehicle for my entire family and friends.   Since I am not technically in the position to purchase a full force tank for the protection and transportation of my loved ones, why not a Subaru?  I could go either way.

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